Plastic welding book update.


It is now possible to purchase a copy of our Plastic Welding Guide Direct, just click on the high lighted words which will take you to blurb.

plasweld_book

The fun and games we had producing the book were posted sometime ago with that in mind this link will take you to that post.

You can also find a link on the web site Plasweld

 

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Top Ten Faring Repairs?


 

This just a bit of fun. Our top ten repairs.

 

cracking

 

1. Welding up a  cracked  panels.

 

 

 

 

 

 

windscreenfingerreplace

 

2. Windscreen finger replacement.

 

 

 

broken-offtab

 

 

3. Sections broken out.

 

 

 

headlightlug

 

4. Relocating mounts on headlights.

 

 

 

 

 

groundoffsections

 

5. Ground off plastic from bikes that have slide down the road.

We rebuild these with plastic not filler.

 

 

bodylug

 

6. Panel support mounts.

 

 

 

 

gsxheadlightbezel

 

7. Making mount post from scratch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

broken-intobits

 

8. Broken panels.

 

 

 

 

One panel made from two

 

9. Missing part taken from a donor panel.

 

 

 

 

smallreplcementparts

 

10. Small parts made from scratch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

When we had the idea to do this everyone thought it was great. The reality is that we could not agree in what order they should be placed or if we had the images required to make the top ten. It would be fair to say that these are the most common repairs we see and to a certain degree can be complicated  to complete.

Welcome to the New Year.


Custom bike

Welcome to the New Year we hope that our customers are well and rested looking forward to what 2017 has to offer. As we look back at 2016 – it was busy for us but not in way we had expected.

On a few occasions we failed to keep up with the demand and thank those that were caught up in it for their patience. For the first time we had to close the workshop to all work, due to the unprecedented heat during the summer. Not that many of us remember it now with all the grey, rain and cold.

seat panels

We have noticed that we are seeing more older bike plastic for repair. These have proved to be more challenging to repair technically speaking because of their age. Brought back some fond memories though!. One of the jobs in particular comes to mind which, came in the form of a rare battery cover from a classic Suzuki. As always we work with our customers to get the best possible out come.

I hate shopping

We are happy to talk to anybody that has a problem with broken plastic. It is part of our service to inform not just sell our ability to repair. It is our way of giving something back. Maybe you will remember us in the future when it comes to that job that does need our expertise.

big sign

We have published a guide on how to repair plastic properly using plastic welding which is available from blurb and from time to time we run plastic welding courses. (At the time of writing we have no planed dates for these courses.)

With the festive period over it is back to work as usual. I should say it is good to be back, but to be honest we have not stopped, as there is now a new web site and a twitter feed for Plasweld.

Best wishes for the New year.

Flattened and Broken could it be saved.


Look away to painful to watch

Look away to painful to watch.

A very rare Kawasaki Z 400 battery cover turned up the other day. The cover managed to unclip itself from the bike while the owner was out for a spin. Before the owner could retrieve it from mortal danger he had the unhappy experience on seeing it crushed under the wheels of a car. So close and yet……

 

On unpacking the close to death part it was examined very carefully. Can it be saved? We rushed it into the workshop to start ‘life support’. There were a number of things that needed to be checked. Plastic of this age can suffer from age related symptoms – water retention and fishers in the surface when

Extensive damage shown from the inside

Extensive damage shown from the inside.

heated. Also the material type had to be checked so it could be matched with one of our donor patches. Without this knowledge ‘life support’ would no longer be needed. Fortunately we had a good match, meaning the prognosis was good. In fact when we tested the material it was in excellent health if it was not for the crush ‘injuries’ and missing bits. So we could bring the panel back to full health but it would take time.

Damage from the outside

Damage from the outside. We were told not to rebuild the dummy air vent.

Before dealing with the breakages we slowly reformed it’s shape by heating the damaged areas that had not broken off. Slowly but surely heat and pressure was applied, bringing it back to its former shape. Then painstakingly we stitched together all the cracks. It is surprising how much stitching

Flattend area reformed

Flattend area reformed. Showing missing lug.

was done – near on six metres! With a part this badly damaged it’s repair has to be staged so that it did not get over heated. Because of this it spent a lot of time in ‘recovery’.

Now that the panel was strong enough it was time to replace the areas that were missing.

Shaped and scraped

Shaped and scraped

For this we used brand new plastic. All the parts were cut to a rough size and then tacked into place. Again taking care not to use to much heat. As we worked, it steadily regained its ‘health’.

New lug made from plastic.

New lug made from plastic. Also shows internal stitching together.

Now that the ‘surgery’ was complete the panel was placed in the recovery area to give the repairs time to settle in. Then the brutal task of flattening and shaping the welding and new material would begin. Once done it would be ready for a new paint graft.

Reformed and welded corner.

Reformed and welded corner.

Rebuilt corner with new plastic. Shaped and scraped

Rebuilt corner with new plastic. Shaped and scraped. The darker areas show where the new material has been added.

Single sided repair? updated.


single sided repair 1

What a single sided repair could look like before new method

Wherever possible we try to fulfill the wishes of our customers. The work we are asked to do can be complicated and delicate at the same time, which can lead to some compromise.

For a long time one area of repair that our customers keep asking about is single sided repair. It is one of the most difficult repairs to achieve. Why? Because the customer adds a complication by not wanting to spend out on an expensive repaint. Which is very understandable when it comes to those annoying small accidents that happen in garages and sheds across the country.

sigle sided repair innerside

Inner side showing welding with new method.

The reason this type of repair is difficult to complete is the heat from the gun penetrates through the broken area and puckers the paint and in some circumstances causes heat shrink. This leaves an unsightly look to the outer finish.

We have over the years completed this type of repair without this happening but it can be unpredictable in its outcome. Because of this we have been looking for a way to stop and or reduce the damage to the outer paint, leading to a more acceptable finish. Very recently we have come up with a method that may give us more control when it comes to single sided repairs. We are still in the early days of it’s use but are encouraged so far with the materials we have used it on. I must point out that this type of repair is only any good for small none structural repairs because this repair does not address the

This repair was completed using the new method.

This repair was completed using the new method.

issue of strength and is more likely to fail in the future. How far in the future only time will tell. We will always maintain that the double sided repair is the best and strongest as it gets rid of the crack completely.

We have noted that there is a fly in the ointment, namely super glue – people will insist that they have a go; we do not have a problem with this attitude but we ask that you use something else because the message is: super glue does not work!! Not only that it makes repairing it properly much more difficult and dangerous where plastic welding is involved and increases the cost.

Paid market research for the right bikers


 showing-off
Get paid for giving your views and opinions on new motorbikes and accessories!

£100 – £125

VisionBee, a dynamic research company are conducting some research and development for a famous motorbike manufacturer.

We are currently looking for riders of adventure touring bikes which were bought from new since 2013, to give their views and opinions on future generation bikes and accessories. The bikes we are looking for are:

Yamaha
MV
KTM
BMW
Honda

This will be held in London for around 2.5 hours on Friday 17th or Saturday 18th June. Those who qualify and take part will be paid £100 to £125 for their time, which includes travel expenses.

If your motorcycle fits the criteria and you fancy being part of this, contact Simon on info@visionbee.co.uk letting him know which model you own, the year you bought your bike, your name, your age along with your telephone contact details. If you cannot make this date or you do not have an adventure bike, do not worry as there are another few projects coming up over the year. Send me your details and I’ll contact you when other projects come along.

Thanks

Simon

For information about Ace Cafe London or what’s on, check out: www.ace-cafe-london.com

Top Ten Faring Repairs?


 

This just a bit of fun. Our top ten repairs.

 

cracking

 

1. Welding up a  cracked  panels.

 

 

 

 

 

 

windscreenfingerreplace

 

2. Windscreen finger replacement.

 

 

 

broken-offtab

 

 

3. Sections broken out.

 

 

 

headlightlug

 

4. Relocating mounts on headlights.

 

 

 

 

 

groundoffsections

 

5. Ground off plastic from bikes that have slide down the road.

We rebuild these with plastic not filler.

 

 

bodylug

 

6. Panel support mounts.

 

 

 

 

gsxheadlightbezel

 

7. Making mount post from scratch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

broken-intobits

 

8. Broken panels.

 

 

 

 

One panel made from two

 

9. Missing part taken from a donor panel.

 

 

 

 

smallreplcementparts

 

10. Small parts made from scratch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

When we had the idea to do this everyone thought it was great. The reality is that we could not agree in what order they should be placed or if we had the images required to make the top ten. It would be fair to say that these are the most common repairs we see and to a certain degree can be complicated  to complete.