First post of the new year.


 Welcome to 2016! Did you have a good time over the holiday period? All rested anchopperd ready to go!? I’m not really ready having trouble getting into the swing of things. I don’t think the constant rain and grey skies are helping.

Anyway! we have reset our opening times back to normal, moving back to our half day Saturday. We have also made some changes to the blog as you can see. Giving it a bit of a spruce up for the new year and changing the header to a drawing of the newer looking GSXR. I have also littered this post with a number of other sketches of bikes.

I did promise to post more often last year but did not keepharleyd it up. I’m not doing that again this time. The real world tends, in our case, to push our digital presence into the background. It is possible this would be different if our business was more digitally based. A lot of what we do does not require a computer.

That just leaves me to say that we wish you all the best for the coming year.

pointrdairfilter

trumphtrickyam

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Get payed for your opinion.


thisbikeiselectricPAID MOTORCYCLE MARKET RESEARCH

Ace Cafe London have been contacted by market research company “Forensic Fieldwork Ltd” who are looking for owners of the below listed motorcycles to attend a focus group. We trust that this may be of interest to you or someone that you know who may fit the criteria.  Please feel free to share it.

Get Paid: £100
Venue: London W.1
Date: Monday 9th June
Time: 6.30pm

You will be required to produce your original V5 documents and photo ID.

Qualifying Motorcycles

Yamaha FZ8 Fazer
BMW F800GT
Honda VFR800
Kawasaki ER-6F
Yamaha XJ6 Diversion
Honda CBR650F

Contact: Aaron Sion, Project Principal:

Tel: 020 3435 5715

Email: aaron.sion@forensicfieldwork.com

Old faring makes it to the repair bench.


finger-repair-plasweldWe introduced recently plastic repair patches for those who wanted an easy way of replacing missing pieces from their farings. It saves time and effort looking for matching plastic material that needs cleaning before it can be used as an insert.

This post illustrates what can be done with our 200 X 130 mm patch and a meter of welding rod.

We have had a broken faring in the workshop that we were going to repair and sell on. It has been on the shelf that long I can no longer remember what bike it came from. A couple of times it has been raided for spares to repair customers farings. I thought it was time to repair it and in so doing demonstrate what can be done with one repair patch.

The faring in question has had the end of the windscreen finger cut off to repair another. A template was cut from a piece of card as a guide from the intact side. Then laid on the repair patch and cut round. A bit of heat was applied to the cut out to shape it so it mimicked the curve of the finger. Then the edge of the faring and shaped piece had the edges chamfered so they could be tacked and welded together. In a number of places it needed over welding to build up the material so it was identical to the other side. Once the heat had dissipated it was machined and rubbed down with some wet and dry for a smooth blended finished. When painted you would not know that the bit had been missing in the first place.

http://www.plasweld.net 

Broken Wing.


A gentleman phoned about a mirror that had broken off his Honda Gold wing. From his description over the phone it sounded like a straight forward weld it back in place. He asked if it would be possible to do this while he waited as he lived a long distance from us.  We said yes and booked him in.

Where the mirror mounted it had broken out a triangle of plastic which included the holes for the bolts. The twist was the triangle had broken into three pieces which were a big problem, it took some time to work out how they went back together, then each bit was welded to each other, trying not to put too much heat into the plastic; this would have been almost impossible on a very hot day. When finished we came up against another setback, the welded piece was a bit smaller than the hole it had come from.

Sometime later after we had worked out how it should align,we tacked it in place and a number of spot welds were  placed to give it  more strength, while we made sure that the bolt holes lined up properly with the base of the mirror. Then slowly we started filling in the gap by over welding the area. The build up of heat was causing a bit of trouble slowing  progress, so allowed it to cool a bit after each over weld.

After the best part of three meters of welding rod the repair came to an end. The customer was over the moon with the quality and precision, so were we.